5 Misconceptions About Yoga

People have preconceived ideas about yoga from what they’ve seen in the media or heard through word of mouth. Yoga unites the mind, body and spirit, and can impact your life in many ways if you allow it. Here are 5 false statements often thought about yoga!

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1) Yoga is only for those who are flexible and have good balance

Yoga is a great way to improve your flexibility and balance. You don’t need to be flexible or have great balance to start yoga. There’s a starting point for everybody. If you focus on yourself during the class instead of comparing yourself to others, your mind set becomes about your personal improvements and victories.

2) Yoga is not a good workout 

Different varieties of yoga will offer you a different level of exercise. It will also depend on your skill level as well. For example, Ashtanga or Vinyasa Yoga will offer more of a cardiovascular or strength workout. Whereas a gentler Hatha Yoga class could be less challenging, depending on the sequence of postures. The poses and postures performed in yoga work to improve your balance, breathing, flexibility and strength no matter what kind of class you are taking part in.

3) I can’t practise yoga with my injuries

Talk to your studio or instructor ahead of time, there are many variations of poses that can help you not only practice yoga while you are injured but help heal your injury. Yoga is great for strengthening the smaller muscles responsible for supporting your ligaments and joints.

4) Yoga is religion based

Although yoga is known to have originated from Hinduism, other opinions today suggest yoga predates Hinduism. Yoga can be a spiritual practise for some, but perhaps not for others, where it is strictly physical.

5) Yoga is only a series of poses and breathing techniques

Yoga is frequently generalized as a fitness routine where people get together and practice different postures and breathing techniques. What many people don’t know is that Postures (also known as asanas) and Breathing Techniques (also known as pranayama) are 2 of Eight Limbs of Yoga in the Sanskrit scripture Yoga Sutra. These include Yama (being honest, non-violent, simple, humble and moderate), Niyama (being self-disciplined and dedicated to one’s spirituality), Asana (what most people are familiar with – physical postures), Pranayama (breathing exercises), Pratyahara (withdrawing from the 5 sesnse to tune into ones mind), Dharana (concentration – creating a still, non-distracted mind), Dyhana (meditation), and finally, Samadhi (the goal of yoga, pure consciousness).

Good Morning

Fueling up for yoga this morning on the deck. Chocolate & banana protein pancakes and spearmint tea. Pranayama in the fresh oxygen before the hot yoga studio.

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1/2 cup of Wheat Free oats
3 eggs whites
Small teaspoon of stevia powder to taste (Krisda is my favourite)
Small teaspoon of organic cacao powder to taste
Any liquid you like to desired pancake batter consistency (I use coconut milk or h2O)
Topped with unsweetened shredded coconut and bananas

Add any protein powder you like to your pancakes, I’m not taking any supplements right now but adding a scoop of protein to your pancakes would suffice 🙂 you would probably need to add less stevia if your protein powder already comes sweetened

6 Ways Yoga Helps Improve Weight Training

Yoga can be a beautiful, challenging practise; both mentally and physically. Western practises of yoga include, but are not limited to, Hatha, Yin, Bikram, Vinyasa (Flow), Ashtanga (Power). The many benefits gained from consistent yoga practise can be the perfect compliment to the different activities that are a part of your lifestyle.

Weight training, a variety of strength training, uses weights (i.e. dumbbells, barbells) to strengthen the muscles. The stress put on your muscles through weight training eventually allows your muscles to adapt, therefore making you stronger. The benefits of weight training include, but are not limited to, muscle strength, muscle endurance and improved muscle tone.

Weight training has been part of my workout routine for the past year. And although I have only been practising yoga for 2 short months I am already reaping the many benefits yoga has bestowed on my weight training routine.

1) Posture: position of the spine

The backbone is extremely vital to human well-being. Not only does the spine protect the central nervous system but also acts as a support to many muscles and organs. Yoga emphasizes the importance of the human backbone by not only strengthening the spine but lightly stretching it. It is easy to forget the significance of a strong spine during weight training. Bad posture while weight training can cause serious injury and decrease the benefits your body derives during weight training. The yoga studio should not be the only place where you practise good posture.

2) Body Awareness: letting go of unnecessary tension

In yoga it is easy to hold tension in places where it is unnecessary and avoidable. Holding an awkward tension in your jaw, shoulders, or anywhere it is not needed can actually afflict the posture or pose you are trying to hold. It is only necessary to keep stress in the areas being worked. This completely applies to weight training. An awkward tension being held in your neck, jaw or anywhere else can take away from the exercise you are performing. Become aware of any muscle tension that isn’t associated to the muscle you are trying to work. For example, if you are attempting bent-row dumbbell rows, keep the tension in your back and arm and not on the leg or knee that is supporting you. Let you face, jaw or tongue be soft.

3) Focus on your own capability – be self focused not self conscious

If others are weight training around you, focus on yourself. You hold your own capabilities. In yoga, just because the person in front of you extends their leg higher in dancer’s pose does not mean that your practise is any less valid. Everyone has their own beginning and their own practise. Time should be spent exploring what you can do instead of comparing yourself to the people around you. That being said, believe in your capability. Don’t push yourself to injury but stepping outside of your comfort zone can help you achieve what you didn’t think was possible.

4) A sense of community

One of my favourite aspects of yoga is the strong energy and community among the people that are practising. Initially I didn’t think that weight training could also have a sense of community. However, community is really there. Everyone around you is dedicating a portion of there day to gain some sort of benefit to achieve a common goal.

5) Moment of rest are just as important as moments of movement

Savasana is easily the most favoured pose in yoga. Savasana relaxes the body and relieves stress. Relaxing the body is just as important as moments of stress. Moments of rest between sets during weight training is essential inorder to not fatigue your muscles. It is just as important to allow time between training the same muscle group. Experts say 2-3 days would suffice to allow your muscles to repair. For example, it wouldn’t be wise to train your quadriceps two days in a row. Just as savasana relieves stress, giving your muscles time to rest allow them to repair and become stronger.

6) Not everyday is the same

Some days when I practise yoga my balance is flawless, other days it could use some work. Other factors could be the cause of this, such as a specific thing I ate, the amount of rest I’ve had, or internal stress, etc. This also applies to weight training. Not everyday is going to be the same. You may be able to lift more or less, longer or shorter depending on other factors. And this is okay. Work to your best ability and accept your body for what it can do in that moment.